Pink Lemonade Theory

Pink Lemonade doesn’t make any sense, if you think about it.

First you have lemons.

Then you dress it up with sugar – knowing that lemonade means making the best of a difficult situation.  So if things are still not working out, can you really just hide problems with a bit more flash and dazzle?

Well, in the short run maybe, but you cannot fool all of the people all of the time.  Those people get really angry when the product or solution you offer really is the old stuff, re-packaged as new again (or pink!).

If you want to make people really upset, tell them you have fixed things, tell them this time it’s different, tell them THIS is the best thing you’ve done so far.  And if it’s not, you’re in trouble.  You will loose all your goodwill earned so far, and their trust will be ten times harder to recover once again.

Mistakes happen when companies are being rushed to get out the latest model. Organizations are sometimes under pressure to save a pending agreement or contract.  It can be an operational challenge to follow-up on all the comments and feedback that you recieve for products or services. But what you say versus what you do, can affect your reputation.

Be careful before you make that next announcement, speech, presentation or press release.  Is it really better, or is it just Pink Lemonade?

Laurie Daschuk, a facilitator with Stop the Presses, organizes meetings for professional organizations and assists professionals with personal branding.

When Everyone is Depending on You!

Your organization has been talking about doing a big event for a long time and now the date is set.  The committee has picked a speaker, the group has made a list for invitations and now they are about to relax and hand the rest of the details to you.

Welcome to the world of event planning.  It is a place where panic is only relative to how close it is to the big day.  Be organized and don’t procrastinate – it will come back to haunt you later.  Set expectations and then act on them.  Don’t wait too long to ask for help in the areas you need it.  No one can do this job alone, even if it is your responsibility.

Get your team together and strategically distribute activities – and then follow up.  You still have to ensure that the job is done well.  Teamwork is tricky:  people need encouragement, support and sometimes a big push.  Remember to document everything you do, so you can create a template for future events.

Also consider bringing in a facilitator to help with the event.  Sometimes the workload for planning an event is too large to do off the side of your desk.  People may underestimate your regular workload – which doesn’t go away when you are working on the big presentation.  Everyone wants a successful outcome, so in the end, it will be worth the investment.